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Watch Jerusalem

Watch Jerusalem brings you news and archaeology from a Biblical perspective. Host Brent Nagtegaal is on location at Jerusalem to give you the most important developments happening on the ground—and emerging from beneath it. Brent Nagtegaal is a contributor for WatchJerusalem.co.il contributor living in Jerusalem.

JERUSALEM - Last week, Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas failed to gain international support at the United Nations for his hard-nosed rejection of President Trump’s peace plan. One member of the Palestinian delegation said the time had come for Palestinians to “reconsider the boycott of the Trump administration and the peace plan it formulated.”Most Israelis support initiating the peace plan for what it gives Israel in the short term. However, most are also banking on the notion that Palestinians will not come to the table to negotiate the long term deal; one that will see dozens of Israeli communities virtually surrounded by a potentially hostile Arab state.In today’s program, Brent Nagtegaal looks at the recent signs showing that the Palestinians may indeed come to the negotiating table. He also discusses why the Bible calls the peace process the “wound” of Israel.
JERUSALEM - In the latest issue of Biblical Archaeology Review, archaeologists Shua Kisilevits and Oded Lipschits discuss the discovery of a 3,000-year-old temple on the outskirts of Jerusalem. Instead of confirming the biblical story, the authors believe their discovery has “fundamentally changed the way we understand the religious practice of the Judahites.” Or put another way, they believe their discovery runs counter to the history described in the Bible.Really?On today’s program, host Brent Nagtegaal looks at the discovery of the cultic place at Tel Motza alongside the history of the Bible. Far from disproving the text, Nagtegaal shows how the physical description of the cultic place and its dating aligns well with the biblical narrative.
The identity of the “lost 10 tribes” of Israel has intrigued people for millennia. While the identity of the Jews—those of the southern kingdom of Judah—remains known, what about those 10 tribes of the northern kingdom of Israel, conquered and deported long before by the Assyrian Empire?In his seminal work The United States and Britain in Prophecy, Herbert W. Armstrong established that the United States and British Commonwealth represent the tribes of Manasseh and Ephraim, respectively. While his book focused primarily on those two birthright tribes, Mr. Armstrong identified the Dutch as descendants of these ancient Israelites.On today’s program, host Christopher Eames examines the evidence for identifying the modern-day Netherlands, and the Dutch people, as the tribe of Zebulun.
JERUSALEM - Almost three weeks after the death of Iran’s arch-terrorist Qassem Suleimani and the face-saving Iranian reprisal attack on American bases in Iraq, the United States is facing the question of its future in the Middle East. No longer bound by a need for Middle East oil, President Trump has made clear he intends to get out of the region, fully expecting European nations to pick up the slack.Will Europe be bold enough to fill the void created by the United States? And how will Iran respond?On today’s program, Brent Nagtegaal discusses what the Bible forecasts concerning a European intervention in the Middle East and the Iranian response.
The identity of the “Lost 10 Tribes” of Israel has intrigued people for millennia. While the identity of the Jews—those of the southern Kingdom of Judah—remains known, what about those 10 tribes of the northern Kingdom of Israel, conquered and deported long before by the Assyrian Empire?In his seminal work The United States and Britain in Prophecy, Herbert W. Armstrong established that the Lost 10 Tribes migrated up into Europe and formed individual nations. He specifically highlighted the identity of the United States as the Tribe of Manasseh, and Britain and her Commonwealth as the tribe of Ephraim.On today’s program, host Christopher Eames examines the evidence for identifying modern-day Great Britain, and the British Commonwealth, as the Tribe of Ephraim.
TEL SHILOH - Known famously for the location of the Tabernacle for 300 years, Tel Shiloh is rich in biblical history. For the past three summers, a massive team of archaeologists and volunteers have excavated the site under the direction of Dr. Scott Stripling. Currently, Stripling and a smaller crew have returned to the site for three weeks this winter to apply the modern technique of wet sifting to previously excavated dirt from earlier excavations.On Friday, host Brent Nagtegaal traveled out to Shiloh to talk with Dr. Stripling about the importance of Shiloh, and the latest discoveries from the excavations.
Jerusalem is the fastest-growing tourist city in the world, declared the Globes website on Sunday. Expected to garner almost 5 million foreign visitors in 2019, many tourists are coming to experience the city’s ancient sites, made increasingly popular by modern archaeological discoveries.However, the flight of so many visitors to Jerusalem is not without controversy. From changes to transportation infrastructure to the narrative presented at the historic sites, disagreements between the Jews themselves, or the Arabs and Jews, are rife.On today’s program, Brent Nagtegaal discusses how such superficial arguments gloss over the dramatic archaeological discoveries themselves, as well as the important message they hold for us today.
“UNDER JERUSALEM – New excavations reveal the ancient city – and stoke modern tensions,” reads the front cover of the December 2019 edition of National Geographic magazine. The article surveys numerous excavations in Jerusalem’s ancient City of David. However, instead of using the opportunity to showcase the stunning history being unearthed, the author focuses on background political noise.On today’s program, Brent Nagtegaal critiques the article for its own political bias, and tells of why such reporting is damaging to current and future archaeological discovery in Jerusalem.
The identity of the “Lost 10 Tribes” of Israel has intrigued people for millennia. What happened to the 10 tribes of the northern Kingdom of Israel, conquered and deported by the Assyrian Empire some 130 years before the end of the Kingdom of Judah? Are the tribes to be found—as many assume—only within the land of modern-day Israel today?Actually, modern-day Israel is generally representative of only one tribe of the ancient 12—the tribe of Judah.As part of his series on the identity of the 12 Tribes of Israel, host Christopher Eames goes back to the basics in examining the evidence for identifying modern-day Israel, and the Jewish people in general, with the Tribe of Judah.